Welsh Costume

I just had to share. Since the Ladies of Llangollen are quintessentially tied to their adopted country of WALES, coming across a site that discusses Welsh Costume wouldn’t be out of place here.

Welsh costume doll

This is one of the dolls in a lengthy and nicely-illustrated entry about “Welsh costume dolls skirts“. Of interest is the discussion of fabrics – and you can see from the above that the COLORS are often spectacular, considering the age of the some of the dolls.

A “companion” site, by the same author, is Michael Freeman’s Early Tourists in Wales. Some of Michael’s VAST research can be found here, on the Ladies of Llangollen site, under the pages “A Plas Newydd Timeline“. Listed chronologically (by month), you’ll find various comments and “meetings” with the Ladies, from the 1780s and beyond their lifetimes. I have fallen down on the job; I know Michael has sent more information than I’ve posted thus far. Mea culpa!

Advertisements

Anne Lister – diaries & discoveries

Been saving up for quite some time some YouTube “finds” on Anne Lister, her diaries, her life &c.

Anne Lister (14:06) presented by JAN BRIDGET  in 2014; includes a tour of Shibden Hall, information on author/editor Helena Whitbread, and later books and films. Bridget also has presented a shorter (10:00) film.

Anne Lister

Decoding Anne Lister (31:58) – Prof. ALISON ORAM on the history of the diaries, in 2011.

_________________________________________________________________________

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Anne Lister’s diaries run to “about 4 million words”, making it “about 3 times as long” as Samuel Pepys’ diaries.
  • one-sixth is written in her own code.

_________________________________________________________________________

The 2010 film, The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister might go away, but I’ll give one instance that I have found (though not sure it’s the one I watched). I found it a lovely film, and feel that Anne-fans will want to own a copy.

Anne Lister’s last steps (1:19:32) – from summer 2016, Dr. ANGELA STEIDELE discusses Anne Lister’s travels, including her last trip abroad.

2013: Two Poems @ Bonhams

poem Lady Eleanor

A mystery ‘CH’ affirms that the poem was written by Lady Eleanor Butler of Llangollen. This, one of two poems (the other showing Sarah Ponsonby’s handwriting, though not of her composition), was sold at auction in 2013.

Here’s the catalogue description:

TWO AUTOGRAPH POEMS, one by Eleanor Charlotte Butler (1739-1829), the other written but apparently not composed by Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1832), both identified as being in their respective handwritings by ‘CH’, both being on very small, delicate and neat hands; Lady Butler’s poem ‘On the New Year’, 12 lines, beginning ‘Thus oft, when Youth has fled, when health decays…’, 1 page, small folio; Sarah Ponsonby’s poem, addressed to Diana, 36 lines in five stanzas, beginning ‘Since thou and the stars, my dear Goddess desire…’, inscribed ‘Written but no[t] composed by Miss Ponsonby of Llangollen’, 2 pages, small folio, the paper from the same stock, formerly pinned together

If anyone has information about what happened to these after the sale, or who “CH” turned out to be – do say!


An interesting, more recent, auction concerned articles in the library of Elizabeth Greenly (1771-1839) [see page 83 of the PDF]. She kept DIARIES from 1784  until before her death – though evidently “edited” them during her lifetime. Two volumes once owned by her came from the library of SARAH and ELEANOR!

Happy 2016!

It is New Year’s Day, 2016. Best wishes to all Ladies of Llangollen readers!

Looking for something totally different, I came across Michael Freeman’s site about Wales & Welsh Travellers. It’s a Wordpress blog (called sublimewales)!

early tourists_wales

I was especially happy to find the page entitled Women Tourists, which made me look up the book Fragments in Prose & Verse by Miss Elizabeth Smith [no relation to the Smiths of Suttons; at least I doubt it…]

elizabeth smith

Miss Smith, at the very least, documented a visit with the Ladies of Llangollen in 1796 (she was in the Llangollen neighborhood in 1798, but they did not stop there). I’ve quickly put in the two quotes on the PLAS NEWYDD TIMELINE(s) for those years.

One early volume (1809), in inimitable books.google fashion, had pages missing; but of an 1811 volume – in TWO volumes, I find copies of volume I (different version; 1824 edition) and will link the 1809 Memoir of Klopstock (vol. II), which I hope is intact. Henrietta Maria Bowdler is the editor. She gives a TANTALIZING picture of “letters that used to be” when writing that Miss Smith had written a letter about her visit to the Ladies (in 1796) which was destroyed. A great loss, indeed!

For readers interested in “historical” travel to Wales, your New Year’s Resolution MUST include some of the books and/or manuscripts noted on Michael’s website.

 

Brideoake discusses Ladies of Llangollen

her campus_brideoake

“Her Campus” an online newsletter of American University, where Fiona Brideoake is a professor of literature, features an interview about her work on the Ladies of Llangollen. She expects her book, “The Ladies of Llangollen: Desire, Interdetermacy, and the Legacies of Criticism“, to hit shelves in the spring of 2016.

butler-and-ponsonbyreview of her 2011 NYU talk

A Glimpse of Things to Come

A blog-reader has promised us an enticing new feature: a bit of a travelogue experience about moving in the steps of Sarah Ponsonby and Eleanor Butler, The Ladies of Llangollen. I wouldn’t at all be surprised if the “Lollies and Trollies” turn up too…

Steps in Plas Newydd grounds

 

Happy Day for Women’s History

Through the ‘about’ page I received a WONDERFUL email from Lisa Unger Baskin, regarding her collection — including a sizable amount of Ladies of Llangollen-related material! — going to Duke University’s David M. Rubinstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

The news (press release) can be read online at Duke Today (April 2015).

woolf desk

As one who uses primary materials, I find it exceptionally heartwarming to read a private collector’s feelings about “being delighted” over the prospect of “students, scholars, and the community” being enriched by access to these treasures.

I am hoping that Lisa herself will tell us about the *treasures* specific to the Ladies of Llangollen – in the meantime, you can read the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection overview here; and a short “teaser” about items relating to the Ladies. (You can explore the collection further by following the links on the right side, for instance – read about May Morris or Maria Sibylla Merian by clicking on the “artists” link.)

Women’s history, in general, is under Duke University’s Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture.  “The Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture in Duke’s Rubenstein Library acquires, preserves and makes available to a large population of researchers published and unpublished materials that reflect the public and private lives of women, past and present.”

NB: The Rubinstein Library is currently closed, 1 July through 23 August (2015). They open (August 24) in a newly-renovated space!

Further reasons for visiting Duke, since the Rubinstein also houses the travel diary of my Mary Gosling (one of Two Teens in the Time of Austen).

Thank you, Lisa Unger Baskin, for “sharing” your invaluable collection!

Previous Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: